Cannonball River in North Dakota at dusk, adjoining the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's reservation land owned by LaDonna Bravebull Allard on the right, and the Army Corps of Engineers land on the left, which is where the main Oceti Sakowin protector camp is located.

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STANDING ROCK.


If you sit with the wind and words of Standing Rock, you feel it.


A gentle hum through the earth and peoples gathered for peace and unity, to protect the nearby land and waters of Lake Oahe with the Cannonball and Missouri Rivers from the Dakota Access Pipeline, or "black snake," as it is also identified. 


Oceti Sakowin or "Seven Council Fires," refers to the original name of the Great Sioux Nation, who lead a main camp near Cannonball, in which the days string together for the thousands of residents comprised of hundreds of tribes, allies, and journalists.


Over the course of nearly two weeks in the Fall of 2016, these photographs show a peaceful and prayerful camp. When asked what was not being covered by the general media, Tom Goldtooth, camp resident and Executive of the Indigenous Environmental Network said the everyday camp life, so that is where this focus rested. Before and after direct actions, rallies and marches, this is where the majority of the people will be. 


Smudge, song, prayer, dance, food, sweats, wood, fire, announcements, interviews, gifts, calls for action - these are all found here.

Dean Dedman Jr. with his daughter, up on the hill dubbed "Media Hill" where the only stable point of cell phone connection in camp can be found. Dean is the hardworking talent of Drone2BWild, a drone with a camera that he has

Dean Dedman Jr. with his daughter, up on "Media Hill" where the only stable point of cellular connection in camp can be found. Dean is the hardworking talent of Drone2BWild, a drone with a camera on daily flight since the beginning of the movement in early April to monitor activities in and around the Oceti Sakowin Camp. Dean's coverage is featured by Al-Jazeera, New York Times, The Guardian, Vice, Fusion, among others.

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The main cooking area near the center of the Oceti Sakowin camp in North Dakota. Large pots of food and coffee for the camp of thousands, averaging from 4,000 to 7,000 on a given day in the Fall of 2016.

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The sacred central fire at the heart of the Oceti Sakowin camp of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North Dakota. A location that is in constant daily use for meals, prayer, talks, songs, dances, offerings, updates, lectures and humor.

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Stanley Perry, an elder of the Navajo nation, stands above the main Oceti Sakowin Camp of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's leading efforts against the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota. He regularly is on the front lines of marches from the main camp as well as giving interviews with journalists.

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Phillip Bird Horse (right), a horsemanship associate at Sitting Bull College in Fort Yates , directs the rider Lance Yellow Earrings, to regain control of a horse in the camp that has been bucking off multiple riders within camp. Phillip stays weekends in camp, lending horses and training to the movement. He is the fifth-generation grandson of Chief Running Antelope, the only Native American ever to appear on U.S. currency; a five-dollar banknote in 1899.

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The upper parts of a tipi decorated with the messages of support from individuals and tribes around the world in the Oceti Sakowin camp of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North Dakota.

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Playing lacrosse on a sunny day in the Oceti Sakowin camp. A sport invented by the Native Americans, here we see the original goal post style in the background, which was a stick with two markings at the lower and upper areas, in between which the thrown object had to strike. Lacrosse in the past was played sometimes across hundreds of miles, to settle disputes between tribes or simply for sport.

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Water bottle donations from around the world in the Oceti Sakowin camp. Covered against the elements, the camp is now preparing for the harsh Winter season moving in.

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Ron His Horse Is Thunder (back) jokes while helping inside the donation tent in the Oceti Sakowin camp. Ron was the former chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and is an outspoken representative of the tribe's interests.

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Detail of a tipi decorated with the messages of support from individuals and tribes around the world in the Oceti Sakowin camp of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North Dakota.

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Fixing the tents in back of the main kitchen area following a cyclone that blew through, tossing over tarps, supplies and entire tents

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Making fry bread in the center of the Oceti Sakowin camp of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North Dakota. Fry bread was developed by the Navajo nation in the 1860's due to being forcibly relocated by the US government from Arizona to New Mexico, a journey of over 300 miles, where without a way to make food from staples of vegetables and beans, fry bread was born of necessity by the rationed combination allotted from lard, sugar, salt and flour.

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Rose Tompkins, also known as Red Day Woman, prepares and cooks soup outside her camper while her son, Clair Fourstar looks on. Inside the camper, Rose prepares tobacco ties and her sweat dress for a ceremony in a nearby sweat lodge.

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Rose Tompkins, also known as Red Day Woman, carefully prepares 28 tobacco ties in her camper, to be infused with prayer, for bringing inside a sweat lodge with her later that night. The ties are made of cedar, tobacco, sweetgrass and sage.

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A tipi in the early morning fog in the Oceti Sakowin camp. The temperature in mid September got down to around 35 degrees.

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Two girls tend to an albino horse in the rain. Shortly after getting braided, "Spirit" was accompanied around Camp to find its owner by the Stephanie Hope Smith, a volunteer Neutral Mediator who recruited the girls to assist her in peace building and creative problem solving.

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One the guard stations near the center of the Oceti Sakowin camp. Occupied most all the time, here we see it in the driving wind and rain. 

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Donated lacrosse sticks at the Oceti Sakowin camp.

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Kitchen workers take some downtime between meals in the Oceti Sakowin camp, at the heart of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protection of local water against the Dakota Access Pipeline. The kitchen is a well oiled machine, providing food all three meals during the day for natives, allies, and activists.

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Sweet corn dries in the sun outside the main kitchen area at the Oceti Sakowin camp in North Dakota.

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Govinda Dalton, producer of a van-based camp satellite radio station of 89,7 FM Spirit Resistance Radio, fields a surprise telemarketing call during an interview with journalists covering the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe lead movement against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

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Phil Little Thunder Sr.,a Brulé Lakota from South Dakota, dances around the central Sacred Fire late at night in the Oceti Sakowin Camp. Phil carries a staff with real a real eagle head and feet, and can often be seen at the head of marches, in protests at the capital in Bismarck, and at night dancing with his sunglasses, interacting and energizing the crowds.

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A young boy leans out of the hatch of an old school bus, converted to a long term mobile living quarters for an ally family of four, parked and supporting the movements at the Oceti Sakowin Camp for water protection against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

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Through an alley of flags brought by hundreds of indigenous nations throughout the world, a group of water protectors from the Red Warrior Camp, carry a homemade black snake with spears through it's head out of the Oceti Sakowin camp. They then carried the snake roughly a mile up Route 1806 to place it at the gates of one of the construction areas of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

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Elijah, 15, part of the Mohawk and Pomo Nations, traveled from Santa Rosa California to Standing Rock, North Dakota. He talks here with three journalists outside the long tipi in the Oceti Sakowin Camp where a historic gathering of elders are meeting. Elijah led the discussion which spanned the topics of human rights, chemistry, American history, astrology, sports and current events.

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Part of the main Oceti Sakowin camp as seen from Route 1806.

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Unpa Nunpa and his daughter, relax in the afternoon as caretakers of one of the seven sacred tipi's along the edge of the Cannonball River in the Oceti Sakowin camp.

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Two youths on the central road, aptly named "Flag Row," through the Oceti Sakowin camp, which is lined by the flags of hundreds of indigenous nations who have given their support and stand in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and their efforts to protect water from the Dakota Access Pipeline project in North Dakota.

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An ally family of four in front of their school bus, converted to a long term mobile living quarters, parked and supporting the movements at the Oceti Sakowin Camp for water protection against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

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A horse in one of the resident round stables of the Oceti Sakowin camp.

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A crowd of indigenous, activists and allies listen to speakers around the Sacred Circle and Sacred Fire at the center and heart of the main Oceti Sakowin Camp.

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Two inverted flags fly above the main Oceti Sakowin Camp of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. The foreground flag was personally made by Robert Suddenbrave, a Lakota man who is a US veteran along with being a ceremonial dancer. Robert explains that a flag presented in this way is a sign of distress, and a call for help.

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A scene near the Oceti Sakowin Camp school and main entrance.

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Rachel, is seen here in the California Camp, one of the many sub-camps of Oceti Sakowin to house the near 7,000 water protectors. Rachel grew up adopted as her biological Mom believed of a more successful future, an ideology forced on Native Americans in the form of the Indian Adoption Project, a federal program that led nearly a third of all indigenous children to be removed from their community, to grow up wholly separated from their family and culture.

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A hot meal poured by James Jones from Wisconsin, who is also a luthier for violins.

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The main board of communication near the central Sacred Circle in the Oceti Sakowin Camp. Cellular phone services are severely limited throughout the camp, so hand written notes and spoken word is the most widely used method of communication.

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Chopping wood near the main kitchen of the Oceti Sakowin Camp. Wood is vital for cooking, warmth, and ceremony throughout the camp, with donations coming in from around the world on a regular basis.

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A member of the internal security detail sits at his station on Flag Row in the Oceti Sakowin Camp in North Dakota.

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Members of the Maidu tribe from California, arrive and set up their tents in the Oceti Sakowin camp. One of the members hand carried a check for $25,000 to personally deliver to the chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Dave Archimbauld II.

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Handprints on the haunches of an albino horse at the Oceti Sakowin Camp who was being temporarily cared for by Stephanie Hope Smith, a volunteer who had been helping as a liason between the tribes and local / regional agencies.

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Children of the Oceti Sakowin Camp immediately after singing a song in the sacred circle.

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Flag Row in the Oceti Sakowin Camp in North Dakota in the rain. At times, the mud from the rain can reach six inches to a foot thick.

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A man walks on the bridge over the Cannonball River towards the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on the other side. He came from the Oceti Sakowin Camp, housed on the land of the Army Corps of Engineers, who has given permission for the large population of water protectors to stay.

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